Science And The Fracking Boom: Missing Answers
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Monday, May 14, 2012 at 10:23 AM
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People living on the front step of the natural gas boom have the same questions: What kinds of pollutants are entering our water and air, and are those pollutants making us sick? Explore key components of the natural gas production process — and the questions scientists are asking.

A technique called hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, has kicked off an energy boom in the United States. Fracking lets drillers unlock vast reservoirs of natural gas that were previously inaccessible. Over the past decade, about 200,000 gas wells have been drilled across the country.

And whether in Colorado, Texas or Pennsylvania, people living on the front step of the natural gas boom have the same questions: What kinds of pollutants are entering our water and air, and are those pollutants making us sick? Explore key components of the natural gas production process — and the questions scientists are asking. [Copyright 2012 National Public Radio]



This article is filed in: Environment, Science, U.S. News, News

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