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YOUR MONEY
Franklin Brunson (left) and Curtis Gilmore help Natasha's mother, Luella Brunson, sit upright in her hospital bed. Along with caring for her aging father, Natasha keeps a close eye on her 80-year-old mother, who is often hospitalized with complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Preparing For A Future That Includes Aging Parents

Nearly 10 million adult children are caring for aging parents today, according to a study by the MetLife Mature Market Institute. But, while aging is inevitable, planning for the costs associated with dependency in the latter phase of life doesn't come easily to most Americans.
YOUR MONEY
President Clinton prepares to sign legislation in the Rose Garden of the White House Thursday, Aug. 22, 1996, overhauling America's welfare system. Today, the ranks of the nation's poor have swelled to a record 46.2 million — nearly 1 in 6 Americans — as the prolonged pain of the recession leaves millions still struggling and out of work.

Poverty In America: Defining The New Poor

Welfare reform in the 1990s, helped slash cash benefit rolls, and yet food stamps are soaring today. One of the original architects of the reform bill says it was a success, but an official who resigned in protest of the bill says that poverty is still on the rise.
 

Is Facebook Worth $100 Billion?

For Facebook to live up to its valuation, the company will need to redefine the ad industry.

Buying Facebook? Investing 101 For Newbies

Facebook stock goes public this week for the first time. That's got at least some of the site's 900 million plus users thinking it's a good time to start investing. Host Michel Martin asks personal finance expert Louis Barajas what new investors need to know when they're ready to take their first steps.

Paying for College: More Tough Decisions

Families struggle to help children with college while providing elderly relatives with health care.

Canada's Housing Market Booms; Experts See Trouble

Canada's real estate market is one of the hottest in the developed world.

The Price We Paid: Gas Is Down, Maybe For A While

After spending much of the year on the rise, gas prices are now falling.

Students To Congress: Don't Let Interest Rate Double

The federal loan interest rate jump could add an average of $1,000 to the cost of a year of college.

Also in Your Money

'Sandwich Generation' Must Make Tough Choices

Record numbers of families consist of adult children, parents and grandparents under one roof. NPR correspondent David Greene and senior business editor Marilyn Geewax talk about the NPR series "Family Matters: The Money Squeeze," which focuses on the pressures faced by the "sandwich generation." - READ MORE

Can Mo' Money Really Mean Mo' Problems?

Many people believe money can solve all their problems. But Richard Watts, a financial and legal advisor to the very rich, says there's some truth to the saying, "more money, more problems." Watts speaks with host Michel Martin about his new book, Fables of Fortune: What Rich People Have That You Don't Want. - READ MORE

Long-Term-Care Insurance: Who Needs It?

As the nation's roughly 78 million baby boomers move into old age, the need for long-term care will soar. But when it comes to long-term-care insurance, relatively few sign up. The policies can be expensive and some big insurance companies have stopped offering them. - READ MORE

Before The IPO: A Private Market For Tech Shares

Facebook will soon go public, allowing anyone to buy shares of the social networking giant. But sophisticated investors have already been buying pieces of Facebook and other hot tech stocks, on private exchanges and secondary markets. - READ MORE

'Be Richer' By Learning From Parents' Mistakes

New college graduates face a sluggish economy, bleak job prospects and mountains of student loan debt. To make matters worse, many are clueless about managing their personal finances. Zac Bissonnette, author of How to Be Richer, Smarter, and Better-Looking Than Your Parents, shares his tips. - READ MORE

When Are You Going To Start Your 5 Year Plan?

As Tell Me More marks five years on NPR's airwaves, personal finance expert Alvin Hall says to let go of the past, and look ahead to your financial future. He says that you can achieve a lot in next five years, and it starts with saving. Hall speaks with host Michel Martin about creating and implementing a personal five-year financial plan. - READ MORE

As Portfolios Recover, More Workers Retire At 65

Many older baby boomers — those already 65 — are choosing to go ahead with retirement rather than wait. That's according to a study by MetLife, which says 45 percent of 65 year olds described themselves as "fully retired." Only 5 percent retired later than planned. - READ MORE

Some Housing Markets Rebound, But Bargains Scarce

The real estate market has turned around in some parts of the U.S., but many buyers aren't seeing true bargains any more. Investors are driving up prices, and inventory is low, especially for homes priced under $250,000. That's not great news for anyone hoping to buy an affordable house to live in. - READ MORE

Discovering The True Cost Of At-Home Caregiving

Few people want to turn over a loved one to institutional care. No matter how good the nursing home, it may seem cold and impersonal — and very expensive. But making the choice to provide care yourself is fraught with financial risks and personal sacrifices. - READ MORE

Parents Hold Bake Sales To Pay Teachers

After years of cuts to public school budgets across the country, many districts are relying on parents to pay for classroom supplies, extracurricular activities and even teacher salaries. But some worry that uneven distribution of funds will widen disparities between schools and between districts. - READ MORE