The Callie Crossley Show

A production of  
  

Thurs., March 31
The Ascent of Geek Culture

For a time in the late 70s and early 80s, playing Dungeons and Dragons meant engaging in sinister, secret activities behind closed doors. Groups of teens were thought to worship the devil and conjure demons through dice rolling, role-playing, and sword-wielding. But once the danger wore off and public interest waned, what remained was a bunch of brainy, imaginative kids rolling dice and drawing maps in their parents' basement, embarking on otherworldly adventures while never glimpsing a fresh ray of sunlight.

But even the most devoted gamers tend to move on from roleplaying after a while. Life's eventualities ensue: socializing, school, lovers, jobs, and kids take center stage, and orcs, wizards and gaming quests take a back seat. But not for Somerville author Ethan Gilsdorf. He's rekindled his love affair with all things fantasy, from Dungeons and Dragons to video games, Rennaissance fairs to sprawling fantasy epics on the big screen. And he's not alone. In the era of Harry Potter, World of Warcraft, Call of Duty, and Lord of the Rings, people of all ages, jocks and geeks alike, are discovering how fun it is to sit back and geek out. Ethan Gilsdorf says D&D changed his life -- and he might have you dusting off the dice after you hear what he has to say.
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ABOUT THE CALLIE CROSSLEY SHOW

Thursday, July 5, 2012       Listen 897
*Originally aired 11/02/12
Walter Mosley on The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey


Walter MosleyLate last year, Walter Mosley joined us to talk about his latest novel, The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey. Mosley’s protagonist, Ptolemy Grey, is an old, ailing recluse living in a dump of a cluttered apartment. His mind, on a downward spiral of dementia, is equally cluttered with a mashup of memories: the death of his wife, the lynching of a friend, his service in World War II. Then everything changes when he’s offered a Faustian bargain—a drug that will restore his brain in exchange for a shorter life. He takes the plunge, hoping mental clarity will help him solve a murder. Though Mosley may be best known for detective novels, his writing spans all genres: literary fiction, science fiction, crime and social commentary. In The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey, Mosely uses threads from all of these styles to tell the story of mortality and morality. 

GUEST:
  Walter Mosley: writer

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