The Callie Crossley Show

A production of  
  

Thurs., Aug 11
Deconstructing Obama

Deconstructing Obama

In a recent piece for The New York Times, Drew Westen, a professor of psychology at Emory University and the author of The Political Brain: The Role of Emotion in Deciding the Fate of the Nation, offers an in-depth analysis of what has gone wrong with President Obama. Westen cites Obama’s rhetorical failings as the main culprit. This may come as a surprise considering Obama’s 2004 speech at the DNC is what landed him in the national spotlight. But here—in Westen’s words- is where Obama is getting it all wrong.

“When he wants to be, the president is a brilliant and moving speaker, but his stories virtually always lack one element: The villain who caused the problem, who is always left out, described in impersonal terms, or described in passive voice, as if the cause of others’ misery has no agency and hence no culpability.”

Today we get Drew Westen’s take on how Obama can reclaim the rhetorical flair that got him into the White house --the rhetorical flair that could keep him there for another term.
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ABOUT THE CALLIE CROSSLEY SHOW

Thursday, July 5, 2012       Listen 897
*Originally aired 11/02/12
Walter Mosley on The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey


Walter MosleyLate last year, Walter Mosley joined us to talk about his latest novel, The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey. Mosley’s protagonist, Ptolemy Grey, is an old, ailing recluse living in a dump of a cluttered apartment. His mind, on a downward spiral of dementia, is equally cluttered with a mashup of memories: the death of his wife, the lynching of a friend, his service in World War II. Then everything changes when he’s offered a Faustian bargain—a drug that will restore his brain in exchange for a shorter life. He takes the plunge, hoping mental clarity will help him solve a murder. Though Mosley may be best known for detective novels, his writing spans all genres: literary fiction, science fiction, crime and social commentary. In The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey, Mosely uses threads from all of these styles to tell the story of mortality and morality. 

GUEST:
  Walter Mosley: writer

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