The Callie Crossley Show

A production of  
  

Thurs., Oct. 20
The Battle for Liquor Licenses

The Battle for Liquor Licenses

Once upon a time, Massachusetts' legendary "blue laws" put all liquor sales in package stores, let churches decide if bars could open in their communities, and limited the hours and days drinking establishments could pull drafts for thirsty customers. Today, a little has changed, but much has stayed the same. We may be witnessing the return of hallowed happy hour, and liquor sales can now happen on any day of the week barring certain holidays, but bars here still close earlier than other major cities, and certain towns in the Commonwealth remain completely dry.

What's less discussed is liquor licensing - how bars and restaurants can legally proffer beer, wine, mixed drinks and shots in the first place. The licenses are expensive, the approval process long, and trying to get one is often a roll of the dice. Massachusetts caps the number of licenses based on population. But cities like Somerville are now taking matters into their own hands, seeing an incentive to lift the caps and make way for businesses to serve drinks alongside meals.

To talk about the process and of liquor licensing in Massachusetts - the history  and the corruption - we're joined by Charlie Perkins, president of the Boston Restaurant Group; Patrick Doyle, executive editor of Boston Magazine; and Somerville Alderman-at-Large Jack Connolly.
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ABOUT THE CALLIE CROSSLEY SHOW

Thursday, July 5, 2012       Listen 897
*Originally aired 11/02/12
Walter Mosley on The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey


Walter MosleyLate last year, Walter Mosley joined us to talk about his latest novel, The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey. Mosley’s protagonist, Ptolemy Grey, is an old, ailing recluse living in a dump of a cluttered apartment. His mind, on a downward spiral of dementia, is equally cluttered with a mashup of memories: the death of his wife, the lynching of a friend, his service in World War II. Then everything changes when he’s offered a Faustian bargain—a drug that will restore his brain in exchange for a shorter life. He takes the plunge, hoping mental clarity will help him solve a murder. Though Mosley may be best known for detective novels, his writing spans all genres: literary fiction, science fiction, crime and social commentary. In The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey, Mosely uses threads from all of these styles to tell the story of mortality and morality. 

GUEST:
  Walter Mosley: writer

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