The Callie Crossley Show

A production of  
  

Mon., Nov. 7
The Cohos Hiking Trail

LMG: Kim Nilsen, Founder of the Cohos Trail

From its base in New Hampshire's White Mountains up to the northern-most reaches of the state, the Cohos hiking trail spans 162 miles of rugged Granite State landscape. Trail-hardened hikers and curious backpackers will find miles of untouched forest, rocky crags and looming peaks, all strung together by an unassuming trail rising and falling with the land, a footpath visible where the brush has been beaten back, where hiking boots have folded down the forest grasses. Far away on the horizon lies a snow-capped ridgeline. Closer, martins keen and hawks wheel over the thick New Hampshire firs.

These vistas were known only to a few dedicated outdoor devotees until thirty-three years ago. Kim Nilsen, a newspaper reporter and intrepid woodsman, decided New Hampshire needed a trail to rival the country's greatest paths. And decades later, after thousands of hours working with volunteers, hacking away with saw and machetes, erecting makeshift bridges and primitive lean-tos, the the Cohos Trail stands as New England's third-longest and one of its remotest. Kim Nilsen joins us to talk about conceiving his project, working countless hours in the woods, and now beginning the next phase for New Hampshire's great hiking trail.
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ABOUT THE CALLIE CROSSLEY SHOW

Thursday, July 5, 2012       Listen 897
*Originally aired 11/02/12
Walter Mosley on The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey


Walter MosleyLate last year, Walter Mosley joined us to talk about his latest novel, The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey. Mosley’s protagonist, Ptolemy Grey, is an old, ailing recluse living in a dump of a cluttered apartment. His mind, on a downward spiral of dementia, is equally cluttered with a mashup of memories: the death of his wife, the lynching of a friend, his service in World War II. Then everything changes when he’s offered a Faustian bargain—a drug that will restore his brain in exchange for a shorter life. He takes the plunge, hoping mental clarity will help him solve a murder. Though Mosley may be best known for detective novels, his writing spans all genres: literary fiction, science fiction, crime and social commentary. In The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey, Mosely uses threads from all of these styles to tell the story of mortality and morality. 

GUEST:
  Walter Mosley: writer

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